Wednesday April 18th: Telematic Hacking - 2nd Exposition

The Interfaces project - an international, interdisciplinary project focusing on bringing new music to an extensive range of new audiences, with MTI/DMU as one of the key partners - continues, with a live & live-streamed event, taking place simultaneously at DMU in Leicester, at the Onassis Cultural Centre in Athens, and online:

TELEMATIC HACKING: EXPOSITION 2
Wednesday April 18th, 2018

UK:
PACE Building, Richmond Street, Leicester UK, LE2 7BQ
19:00 (GMT)
Free entry

Greece:
Onassis Cultural Centre – Upper Stage
21:00 (GMT +2) | Free entry

Artists include:
Network Ensemble, Tim Shaw, Aram Bartholl, Dirty Electronics, Tim Ward, Yiannis Kotsonis, Robert Chafer

Streaming: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCz3v_NAf3eVqL_lpmaxGM1Q

The event will be streamed to the Interfaces YouTube channel and shown ‘live’ to an audience at the Upper Stage of the Onassis Cultural Centre.

http://www.interfacesnetwork.eu/post.php?pid=30-telematics-hacking
https://www.facebook.com/events/1721865131205742/

A group of leading artists exploring the materiality of the Net meet in a telematic room. Over a series of meetings a new work emerges. Tools and hardware hacks to sound the network will be investigated. The devising will be ‘televised’ online and the telepresent audience will be invited to make their own ‘instrument’ for performance. The telematic meetings will coalesce in exposition events at a set time and physical location.

Telematic hacking initiative is in partnership with Music, Technology and Innovation Research Centre of De Montfort University and the ╬čnassis Cultural Centre Athens in the framework of the INTERFACES project supported by the Creative Europe Program of the European Union.


Network Ensemble
http://networkensemble.com/

Tim Shaw
https://tim-shaw.net/

Aram Bartholl
https://arambartholl.com/offline-art-new2-eng.html

Dirty Electronics
http://www.dirtyelectronics.org/

Onassis Cultural Centre, Athens
http://www.sgt.gr/eng/SPG1/

DMU will contribute to the telematics arts initiative focusing on hacking, as a particularly appropriate means of telematic performance. Many sounds from hacked instruments have unique characteristics and behaviours and do not operate in the same manner as traditional instruments. Such issues as latency in networked performance will not be seen as a detriment, but instead as part of the material nature of the Net that offers unique possibilities for making music together.

DMU will work with hackers, cyber security experts and artists facilitating international collaborative works and coordinate a number of telematics events and expositions which can be seen as a live stream or later on a YouTube channel. The basic concept here is to legally hack internet routers so that they are able to sonify the movement of data across the Internet. International partners in New Zealand, China and throughout Europe will work on this project alongside the other Interfaces partners such as OCC in Greece.

The impact of this initiative may not be primarily in the large number of users within a finite amount of time, but instead, enabling the creation of a new, technology-driven form of community-based music making crossing age groups, levels of ability and cultural background possible and most importantly bringing together people from all around Europe. The community of interest will grow well beyond the end of the project’s duration

What is Telematic Hacking?

A group of leading artists exploring the materiality of the Net meet in a telematic room. Over a series of meetings a new work emerges. Tools and hardware hacks to sound the network will be investigated. The devising will be ‘televised’ online and the telepresent audience will be invited to make their own ‘instrument’ for performance. The telematic meetings will coalesce in exposition events at a set time and physical location.

Network as instrument

Many sounds from hacked instruments have unique characteristics and behaviours and do not operate in the same manner as traditional instruments. If we consider the Internet router as a musical instrument this opens up the possibility of new repertoire and audiences.

Hacking the network

Hacking and subsequently performing with a networked device would suggest broader access issues relating to music making. In the case of a router, it could be looking at the manipulation of the way in which data packages are sent and received with an interest for the sonification of this data or router behaviour. Such issues as latency in networked performance are not to be seen as a detriment, but instead as part of the material nature of the Net that offers unique possibilities for making music together.

A new form of community music making

This initiative aims to create a new, technology-driven form of community-based music making crossing age groups, levels of ability and cultural background and most importantly bringing together people from all around Europe.

Since November 2017, OCC & DMU have been working with hackers, cyber security experts and artists facilitating international collaborative works and coordinate a number of telematics events and expositions. The 1st open event took place in November 2017 where the participating artists had the opportunity to present their ideas and a prototype-based telematic performance. The event was hosted by De Montfort University in Leicester and was also live streamed on the Interfaces YouTube channel.

Participating artists will discuss and workshop ideas for Telematic Hacking. Each artist is open to interpret the brief in their own way, develop ideas discussed in the meetings, or work collaboratively. The use of Periscope will allow for the public to drop in on the development of the project.